Mostrando postagens com marcador Folk Rock. Mostrar todas as postagens
Mostrando postagens com marcador Folk Rock. Mostrar todas as postagens

3 de ago de 2016

23 de jun de 2016

A.B. Skhy - Folk Psychedelic Blues Rock


A.B. Skhy (originally New Blues) was an American electric blues band from Milwaukee formed in 1968. They recorded two albums before splitting up in the early 1970s. Formed in Milwaukee in the late 1960s as New Blues, the band comprised Dennis Geyer (guitar, vocals), Jim Marcotte (bass guitar), Terry Anderson (drums), and Howard Wales (keyboards). Wales had previously played with artists such as James Brown and Freddie King. They relocated to San Francisco and changed the band name to A.B. Skhy, building a following with live performances. They were signed by MGM Records and worked with producer Richard Delvy on their self-titled debut album, released in 1969. The album featured contributions from guitarist Russell DaShiell, harmonica player Jim Liban, and flautist Otis Hale and spawned the single "Camel Back", which reached number 100 on the Billboard Hot 100. The group then split, with Andersen and Wales leaving, the latter going on to play with Harvey Mandel, Jerry Garcia, and The Grateful Dead. Geyer and Marcotte recruited drummer Rick Jaeger and guitarist James "Curley" Cooke (formerly of The Versitones and The Steve Miller Band), and the new lineup recorded a second album, Ramblin' On, in March 1970 with Kim Fowley and Michael Lloyd producing. The album included a mixture of cover versions and original songs by Cooke. A third album was started but the band split up before it was completed. Cooke went on to play in Cat and the Fiddle and with Boz Scaggs and Ben Sidran (who had played harpsichord on Ramblin' On), and released the solo album Gingerman in 1980. Jaeger joined DaShiell in Crowfoot and recorded with several artists as a session player.






27 de mai de 2016

A Fleeting Glance - Rare Psych Folk Rock


One of the most astonishing British private pressing rarities, only two copies have surfaced of this 1970 concept album. Telling the story of a woman's life from her own conception to giving birth, the LP was put together by a variety of musicians at a social club, and allegedly includes an uncredited appearance by Billy Fury. Linked by narration and sound effects, the music runs the gamut from heavy space-rock jamming (including a snatch of 'Interstellar Overdrive') to folk rock (an acoustic cover of 'Light My Fire' & a stunning version of 'Watch The Stars') avante-garde choirs, krautrock-styled interludes and even trad jazz. The result is among the trippiest albums I have ever heard, comparable only to Jumble Lane in terms of eccentricity, although the music is infinitely better, with a strong Pink Floyd spacy edge. Indeed, had Syd Barrett remained with the Floyd, one could well imagine 'Dark Side of The Moon' might have sounded thus."







3 de mai de 2016

Diesel Therapy - UK Folk Rock



Diesel Therapy is a four piece band from the North East of England. You would somehow expect a band that has the initials DT to be into alcohol fuelled, happy-go-lucky, timeless, noisy, bar room filled, leather clad, rock and roll but, actually, they are something of a laid back country band. They can surprise though. They can rock and roll if and whenever they want to, and they can even do a little bit of Little Feat if they choose – all that neat, syncopated shuffle, Southern Country rock charm; Diesel Therapy can do more than the obvious.




15 de abr de 2016

A Passing Fancy - Folk Psych Rock



A Passing Fancy was a Toronto band from the mid-1960s fronted by the singer-songwriter and guitarist Jay Telfer, today publisher and editor of the antique collector's magazine Wayback Times, and Dr. Brian Price, president of In The Game Hockey Cards. The band's debut single, Telfer's “I’m Losing Tonight”, released in February 1967, reached No. 22 on the CHUM chart the following month. While its follow up, “You’re Going Out Of Your Mind” only made No. 37 in June, the group's third single for Columbia, “I Believe in Sunshine” restored some faith by reaching No. 28 in September. By then, Steve Wilson had left and Louis Pratile joined on drums. During the summer of 1967, A Passing Fancy played at Expo ’67 in Montreal where they jammed with local band, Les Tetes Blanches. The moderate success of the singles, prompted Columbia to finance a fourth single, “People In Me”, was listed at No. 48 and failed to chart anymore when it was released in December. Telfer's demanding need to practice was met with little enthusiasm by Price who was completing his third year in university and wanted to pursue a career in dentistry. In March 1968, Price quit. Although Telfer was recognized as the musical leader of the group, Price was the founder and spiritual and business leader. His leaving the band had a major impact on Seon and Mann. A Passing Fancy carried on by replacing Price with Fergus Hambleton on organ and vocals and Brian Smith who contributed a third folky guitar but the chemistry of the band was never the same. After shooting at the CBC, playing the first Let's Go TV show in colour and performing that same night at the Granite club, Telfer was told by the Wal-Dan management that he would no longer be in the group. Unhappy over the new direction Seon and Mann left shortly thereafter. A few months later, in June 1968, the remaining members of the band also left.